What The Pandemic Teaches The Younger Generation About Their Health | 3 Min Reading Time

It hit us unawares. With all our sophistication, politics & technology, we found ourselves gasping for air, as the pandemic squeezed us in the hollow of its mighty unforgiving palms, driving life out of our sore lungs.

We have lost many – heroes, civilians & fighters. The year 2020 was meant to be a year where we celebrate nurses & midwives, the backbone of health sectors, but it turned out, by providence (maybe), to be one of the most horrifying years in our history as a race, where we saw unbelievable amounts of deaths in such a short period of time.

In retrospect, what have we learned from it all? Or what are we learning? A lot. We now have a vaccine. It sounds impossible, but we were able to do it – create a vaccine within a very short period of time. Impressive & encouraging.

Now, let us look at the lessons taught from another very important perspective.

What has the younger generation of human beings got to learn from the year of the pandemic?

One Important Lesson

One of the most important lessons that they can learn is the need for them to take very good care of their health.

The population of human beings that suffered the most from the assault of the pandemic, were those who were under the burden of one type of disease or the other [mainly non-communicable diseases]; either diabetes, hypertension, or other types of chronic diseases, which can be prevented, to some extent.

It is a lesson to them, that they must take proper care of their health. Those who have started to mess their health up must begin to come to the realization that their bodies are like organic armors that prevent them from dying early if they take care of it well.

Our bodies are gifts from God, and it is our sole responsibility to take very good care of it – eat well, exercise regularly, observe proper rest, ensure regular health checks, and take care of your mental health.

The death rate among infants and very young ones [young adults inclusive], was almost negligible because these groups still have their immunities intact. They have not, presumably, assaulted their bodies defenses with alcohol, smoking, bad foods, lack of rest, stress & every other form of assault that you can think about that we expose our poor temporal armors to. [though hypothetical, the immune system defence in children against the corona virus is still widely disputed, but we can’t completely discard the facts that point us to the reality that the mechanism of the immune system defenses still has an obvious role to play].

As the United States’ covid-19 death toll moves relentlessly beyond 200,000, data shows that only about 100 children and teenagers have died of the disease, a fatality rate that is drawing wonder from clinicians and increasing interest among researchers hoping to understand why.

If you are a young adult, and you have found out that you have a form of disease, the best time to start fighting it is now, and not when you are fifty, you may not even get to the age of fifty. Considering the way the average life expectancy of humans is reducing, fifty may already looking like old age [while factoring in other important demographic elements].

Start taking care of yourself. Young man, you are liable to die young if you do not take good care of your health. I have seen very young fellows struggling with hypertension. It may not be their fault, the cause of the hypertension or diabetes may be idiopathic in nature, but that does not mean that you should not take extra care of yourself, or on the other hand, it may be mere carelessness.

To the younger generation. If you can read this. You need your body well & strong to fulfil your destiny here on earth. If before the age of forty, you damage your liver, lungs, kidneys, and brain with the toxicity that abounds in life, you may not live long enough to accomplish that which you were born for.

I have seen a lot of people who would have lived pretty beautiful lives, die young, all because they could not summon the discipline to live healthy lives. I don’t want you to be like them in the next thirty or forty years to come. I want you better, and stronger.

Smoking does no good to the human body. Alcohol also does no good. It’s a drug and it is addictive, why is it not like water? Because it is not water, water was made to keep you healthy, alcohol does the opposite, and it does its job pretty well.

Rest, rest, rest & rest. Those who take out enough time to rest are not lazy. They are wise. Too much work can kill you, I will not be polite about it. You are not a donkey. I know you want to survive, but there are so many other ways to survive in this generation, thank God for the internet that has made it possible for many to become financially free from the confines & comforts of their homes.

The path to a healthy life has never changed, and it will not change if we remain here on earth for the next three thousand years. Evolution (if there’s anything like that), will never eliminate the need for us to stay healthy, instead, it keeps emphasizing that need. Read your biology textbooks, and you will discover that our planet becomes healthy over the years. It has been living healthy, save for us who came around some years ago to start turning things upside down.

That notwithstanding, nature itself advocates for health. Why should you rebel against her?

This is among the biggest lessons that this pandemic teaches the next generation of human beings. Stay healthy, at all costs – strive to be at your optimum, to be in your best shape when the storm comes by.

The pandemic revealed to us a lot about the importance of public health, exposing many flaws that we had cleverly concealed. Not knowing that a season was coming that would bring everything in the dark to light.


Featured Image Credit: Unsplash | <a href=”http://<span>Photo by <a href=”https://unsplash.com/@edwinhooper?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText”>Edwin Hooper</a> on <a href=”https://unsplash.com/s/photos/pandemic-fatigue?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText”>Unsplash</a>Edwin Hooper


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